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Dating with HPV

So you just found out you had HPV? Or maybe you found out a while ago, and are now starting to think about it's affect on dating?

Well you're not alone... usually a person notices bumps in their genital region - and start searching online. Oh my gosh I have an STD! Why did I of all people get an STD? I've been careful! Well, STDs like Genital Warts are highly contagious - which means, most people that have had sex, have been exposed to HPV. But no one talks about it you say? Who wants to admit they have stuff growing down there!

Well that's where the question of dating comes in...

  • Do I ask people if they have HPV right when I'm interested?
  • Do I ask potential partners if they know what HPV is?
  • Do I tell them right away about HPV or when we're about to have sex?
  • Are they going to stop talking to me when I tell them?


We believe what the Center for Disease Control when they say that 20 million Americans have HPV with over 6 million new cases each year. That's over 50% of sexually active people!

But, if someone hasn't shown symptoms when you tell them that you have HPV, you know what they'll do. They'll pull up Google and do a search on Genital Warts or HPV - and see horryfing instances of HPV, most of which make our cases look silly in comparison!

HPV FAQ Recommends Positive Singles for HPV Dating and Friends.


We believe most people that have HPV come out of the experience a better person. It causes a period of self reflection that we believe is condusive to healthy relationships in the future. So what are we saying? Why not date someone that has experienced HPV? Think about the immediate understanding and bond you'd have?

Where can you find this you ask? HPVFAQ reccomends that you start out at HPV Support. It's the largest user base of people with HPV or other STDS - you can find your match based on what STD you have and take it from there. The user interface is very community oriented, and actually fun to use.

Well, a recent study by University of California San Francisco discovered the following:
"Negative stigma reactions were less severe than the discloser expected".

 

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